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The Importance of Compassion in Estate Planning

When you think about the word compassion, what comes to mind? Caring, tenderness, sensitivity? When you think of compassionate professions, what jobs spring to mind? We bet that attorney wasn’t the first profession to pop into your head.

While attorneys are not always known as a compassionate group of individuals, estate planning is one aspect of the legal framework that should be built almost entirely on compassion. At The Law Offices of Stephanie Hon, here’s why we believe compassion is the core of the estate planning process.

 

What is Compassion?

The Oxford Dictionary defines compassion as an emotion one person feels when they are moved by the distress or suffering of another person. Compassion is an emotional, sympathetic response that humans have when confronted with the pain or suffering of another person. For a moment, we place ourselves in the shoes of another and can feel the emotions they feel. It is a unique response that helps us build a greater emotional and personal connection to others.

 

The Importance of Compassion in Estate Planning

The legal profession is often seen as cold. It is about facts, figures, and words weaved in such a way as to achieve a favorable outcome for a client. The law is based on logic, not emotion. However, estate planning for most individuals is emotional. One reason people don’t create estate plans is that thinking about what happens after death means confronting their vulnerabilities. It means contemplating your mortality. Confronting these feelings can be painful, emotional, and overwhelming. You don’t want to open yourself up to someone unless they can sympathize with your struggles and help you manage your fears and goals.

An estate attorney should be the perfect blend of logical and compassionate. Someone who can effectively navigate the legal process, but also provide sensitive advice about what’s best for you and your family. Compassion starts with listening. A compassionate attorney will spend more time listening than talking. Why? It’s because they want to understand what’s important to you. They want to know what’s at stake. Only then can an estate planning attorney help you find solutions that address your unique goals.

 

What Does Compassion Look Like?

Compassion can be conveyed through words, a tone of voice, or a warm smile. In the estate planning, framework compassion means:

  • Providing responsive and considerate feedback to you
  • Always keep your values and goals in mind when crafting an estate plan
  • Giving you the time you need to process your emotions and consider your estate planning options
  • Making our legal team available to you when you need us most
  • Offering flexible scheduling options to meet your needs

It’s hard to picture what life will look like without you in it. Yet, having an estate plan in place is the best way to ensure that your wishes are carried out and that a piece of you will always remain in the lives of your family and friends.

 

Contact an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney 

At The Law Offices of Stephanie Hon, compassion isn’t a word, it is a mentality. We know you may be hesitant to begin the estate planning journey. Rest assured that our compassionate team will guide you through the process with efficiency and warmth.

 

Contact our office today to get started.  

Stephanie Hon

Author
My goal is to be your trusted advisor who helps you make the very best personal, financial and legal decisions for you and your family throughout your lifetime.

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